August 2017 Auction Ends Thursday, August 24th, 5pm Pacific
Fantastic autograph letter signed by Albert Einstein where Einstein predicts his ''hypothetical Nobel Prize'' in 1918, four years before he won it for his Special Theory of Relativity, published in 1915. In this lengthy letter spanning three pages, Einstein also critiques and compliments fellow physicist Hermann Weyl, and analyzes the divorce settlement with his first wife (including proceeds from the future Nobel). Undated, but with original envelope postmarked from Berlin on 23 June 1918, signed ''A. Einstein''. In this letter, Einstein writes to Michele Besso, Einstein's closest friend and the only person credited on the original paper for the Theory of Special Relativity. In German, letter reads in part, ''Dear Michele! / Seeing your handwriting always makes me happy in a very special way, for nobody is as dear to me as you are and knows me as well as you do and is as kindly disposed towards me. Don't waste another thought on my adventure in correspondence with Anna [Besso's wife], I don't want to bear a grudge against her and want to be grateful to her for her effort. But I must say one thing. Nobody has ever been so outrageously rude to me, and I hope that in future nobody else will be! / [Hermann] Weyl is an ingenious and fine chap, but his concept of electricity is no good; I wrote to [Walter] Dallenbach about this in more detail, nothing new, by the way. But I will not try to persuade either of you, rather leave that for time to accomplish. I would have loved to have heard Weyl's lecture; all of his thinking is so inventive and beautifully shaped. And he certainly knows his math!! / Write a book on statistical mechanics? I would not have the patience. Gibbs' book, by the way, is a masterpiece, though hard to read, and the most important thoughts are between the lines.... / Well, you rascal - recommending to a friend that he should write books is easy, but where, then, is your book, about which you spoke to me quite seriously last year? Par nobile fratrum! ['What a pair we are!' in Latin] / Now about the contract. I am very reluctant to propose new changes or addenda to Mileva, considering that she is satisfied now. I am sure that she will handle the money with care after my death; therefore, I do not want to burden her with controls, so let us leave off the addendum to 2). The addendum to 3) will not apply, because the interest on a hypothetical Nobel Prize will not exceed Fr. 8,000. Finally, I cannot possibly ask my uncle to provide for my boys as well; in fact, I would not want this at all. Besides, who knows what part of his splendor our glorious time will still leave him. I am very skeptical. / In addition to what we just reached an agreement on, Miza [Mileva] will receive Fr. 5,000 at the time of my death, and, furthermore, she still has savings of Fr. 10,000 (her dowry). If you add to this the fact that her parents are not exactly poor, it must be said that the children are provided for quite decently, though not magnificently - incomparably better, certainly, than I was provided for at the time...My health is unquestionably better than last year. Elsa is untiring in cooking my chicken feed for me every three hours, and I do very little, I stay on my balcony most of the time. Everybody says that I never looked as well as I do now. Meanwhile, peace will have to come one of these days, so travel will be easier again. I am really sad that I am not able to see my boys. In spite of Miza's laments in this regard, however, I think that it does not matter very much to them. / One more thing. Tete [Einstein's youngest son, Eduard] wants a nice book from me as a present (a travelogue). With all the censorship, sending it from here would be very difficult. So please buy one and send it on my behalf. Today I received a letter from him for the first time...Affectionate greetings / from your / Albert''. Letter and envelope are marked with paste by the censor, as World War I was ongoing. Letter on card-style stationery measures 5.25'' x 8.25'', with original envelope showing Einstein's return address and signed by him, ''A. Einstein''. Besso has added some writing to the letter and back of the envelope, listing several books to fulfill Einstein's request for a travelogue for his son, partly affecting the signature on the last page. Uniform toning and light chipping to edges, overall very good condition. Accompanied by a complete translation.
Albert Einstein Autograph Letter Signed From 1918, Predicting His Nobel Prize Years Before Winning ItAlbert Einstein Autograph Letter Signed From 1918, Predicting His Nobel Prize Years Before Winning ItAlbert Einstein Autograph Letter Signed From 1918, Predicting His Nobel Prize Years Before Winning ItAlbert Einstein Autograph Letter Signed From 1918, Predicting His Nobel Prize Years Before Winning It
Albert Einstein Autograph Letter Signed From 1918, Predicting His Nobel Prize Years Before Winning ItAlbert Einstein Autograph Letter Signed From 1918, Predicting His Nobel Prize Years Before Winning It
Albert Einstein Autograph Letter Signed From 1918, Predicting His Nobel Prize Years Before Winning It
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