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You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown

From 1950 – 2000, people worldwide followed the beloved motley crew of Charles Schulz’s “Peanuts” gang as they made their way to print each week in the whimsically funny comic strip that ran 17,897 strips in total throughout his incredible career.

Schulz

via Schulzmuseum

Schulz

It’s said Schulz woke up to a jelly donut each morning, working on his famous four-panel strips with an idea sometimes burgeoned in minutes, and would draw up his revered illustrations in less than three hours, finishing some in as quick as an hour.

After his first 1950 strip appeared in nine newspapers, he refused to hire help throughout his entire career, saying that “it would be equivalent to a golfer hiring a man to make his putts for him.”

Born in 1922 in Minnesota, Schulz published his first strip at the young age of 28 years old and continued to do so until his death in 2000.

Schulz

via AltComics 

We’ve been auctioning Schulz strips for years, and to this day, continue to see incredible prices realized for Schulz’s hand-drawn signed strips. In the 30+ signed strips we’ve auctioned over the past few years, they’ve sold in total for over $500k in consignment prices realized. 

In our December auction, we’re auctioning a very early 1957 four-panel strip featuring the greats, Charlie Brown, Snoopy & Lucy.

Schulz

Just last month, this 1952 strip sold for $19,102.80 in our November auction, featuring early character Shermy, who was one of the original first four characters.

Schulz

And in our October auction, this 15-frame Sunday strip from Halloween of 1965 sold for an incredible $40,953.60.

Schulz

As Sunday strips are the most valuable, this 1968 Sunday strip featuring Linus sold for $23,115.60.

Schulz

With half a century’s worth of work that continues to be syndicated around the world daily, Schulz’s humanistic, anti-hero characters forever stand the test of time.

When asked endlessly in interviews why he wouldn’t lighten the tone of his strips, let Charlie Brown finally succeed, he responded in his 1980 book, ”Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Me,”

“You can’t create humor out of happiness…I’m astonished at the number of people who write to me saying, ‘Why can’t you create happy stories for us? Why does Charlie Brown always have to lose? Why can’t you let him kick the football?’ Well, there is nothing funny about the person who gets to kick the football.”

 

 

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