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Sell or Auction Your US Constitution 40 Signers Complete Set for up to About $100,000 or More at Nate D. Sanders Auctions

FREE APPRAISAL. To buy, auction, sell or consign your US Constitution 40 Signers complete set that is for sale, please email your description and photos to Nate@NateDSanders.com of Nate D. Sanders Auctions (http://www.NateDSanders.com).

Free Appraisal, Auction or Sell Your US Constitution 40 Signers Complete Set

Below is a recent realized price for a complete collections of autographs of Signers of the U.S. Constitution. We at Nate D. Sanders Auctions can obtain up to this amount or more for you:

US Constitution 40 Signers Complete Set. Sold for About $100,000.

Here are some autographs we have sold of U.S. Constitution signers we have sold:

Thomas Jefferson Handwritten Report as President Regarding the Lewis & Clark Expedition — “…Capt. Lewis who has been sent to explore the Missouri to its source & thence to pursue the nearest water communication to the South sea, passed the last winter among the savages 1600 miles up the Missouri. Deputies from the great nations in that quarter (2500 miles from hence) are now on their way to visit us. Lewis finds the Indians every where friendly. He will probably set back in 1806…”

Exceptional, museum-worthy report, handwritten by Thomas Jefferson as President, regarding the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Letter is addressed to William Jarvis of the U.S. consul in Lisbon, Portugal, dated 6 July 1805, describing the historic expedition that Jefferson authorized during his Presidency. In its entirety: “Sir / Since my letters of the 19th & 20th of July 1804 I have received your favors of Oct. 6 Nov. 14-25 Dec. 3 1806 & May 15 1805. As also some articles of fruits & for which I may you accept my acknowledgments. The pipe of Arruda vine came also safely to hand, and is indeed of very superior quality. I should be glad to receive always of exactly the same quality, adhering to the rule of putting no brandy to them. I had been for some time expecting your draught [draft] for the amount; but as you mention in your last that when you forward another pipe you will draw for both, I shall hold myself in readiness, and will be glad the vine would come out in autumn, so as to be here before the winter sets in. It gives me much pleasure to see a hope that Portugal may be able to preserve her neutrality. That a government so just & inoffensive should be forced into a war with which it has nothing to do shows the most profligate disregard to human rights. It is a great felicity to us and it secures all our other felicities, that so wide an ocean is spread between us & the lions & tygers of Europe, as enables us to go forward in the path of justice and independence fearing nothing but our creator. The great powers of Europe could do us injury by sea & on our shores. But the spirit of independence in the country at large they can never bend. We are now suffering from privateers on our coast, and are therefore fitting out a naval force to go & force them to keep a reasonable distance from our shores. Capt. Lewis who has been sent to explore the Missouri to its source & thence to pursue the nearest water communication to the South sea, passed the last winter among the savages 1600 miles up the Missouri. Deputies from the great nations in that quarter (2500 miles from hence) are now on their way to visit us. Lewis finds the Indians every where friendly. He will probably set back in 1806. Receipt my friendly salutations and assurances of respect.” Document measures 8″ x 10″ on two pages, with integral fly-leaf addressed to Jarvis in the hand of Jefferson’s secretary. Toning and folds throughout, with minor tape residue at top and a tiny chip at lower right corner. Near fine condition with bold, legible handwriting. An important piece of handwritten history by the President who commissioned America’s greatest exploration adventure. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: A near exact copy of this letter resides in the Library of Congress’ Thomas Jefferson Papers. One of the two letters was produced by Jefferson’s polygraph machine (used from 1804 until his death), which provided an immediate copy of his handwritten letters. Though impossible to determine which copy was produced by the pen that Jefferson held, Jefferson typically kept the machine-produced letter as a copy for himself. Since this letter was mailed to William Jarvis (unlike the letter in the LOC), it’s probable that this letter was the one handwritten by Jefferson. Sold for $226,871.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Thomas Jefferson Scarce Signed 1st Edition of the First U.S. Census — One of Only a Handful Signed & Ratified by Jefferson

Extremely rare Thomas Jefferson signed first edition of the first U.S. census, one of only a handful of Jefferson signed copies sold at auction in the last 40 years. As Secretary of State, Jefferson called for the first official census, and ratified the results of only a handful, this being one of them, signed boldly ”Th: Jefferson” on page 56. Published in Philadelphia: Childs and Swaine, 1791. Full title reads, ”Return of the Whole Number of Persons Within the Several Districts of the United States, According to ‘An Act Providing for the Enumeration of the Inhabitants of the Unites States’. Printed in a small number for distribution by Thomas Jefferson as Secretary of State, and from his direct descendant, Thomas Jefferson Coolidge Jr., with Mr. Coolidge’s crested label to front pastedown. Bound in 19th century half-morocco and marbled boards, book measures 5” x 7.25”. This copy appears to be one of the very first printings of the first edition, as it lacks the tipped-in late-returning results from South Carolina often found on page 54. The lower margins of pages 34, 42 and 43 have been shaved by binder, otherwise copy is near fine with a touch of toning and foxing. Volume also includes a press copy of an autograph letter signed by Jefferson, affixed to rear endpaper, dated 8 October 1797, measuring 6.5” x 7.75”. Letter concerns a quarterly dividend of ”a few dollars over 300”, payable to Col. James Monroe. A rare opportunity for the very first census of the United States, signed by its 3rd President, with other such copies selling for approx. $100,000. Sold for $66,435.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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John Adams Reflects Upon the Real Causes of the American Revolution — “…what would be the consequences of an attempt on the part of Great Britain, to carry into…Authority over Us…War and Carnage, and devastation I saw – or thought I saw must be the consequence – and I fully believed that all the horrours of such a Contest would never wholly subdue the old non-conformist Spirit…” — Extraordinary and Moving Letter on the Indefatigable Spirit of the American Colonists

Exceptionally stirring and important letter signed by John Adams almost 50 years after the American Revolution, after which enough time had passed that Adams felt compelled to correct the record about the true causes of the American Revolution. Addressed to Jonathan Mason of Boston, letter is dated 31 August 1820 from “Montezillo”, Adams’ playful comparison to Jefferson’s larger estate at Monticello. In this letter, Adams posits that the fear and hatred of heirarchy, especially in matters of religion by The Church of England, were the wellspring of revolution, rather than simple economic or social issues. In part, “…The real principles, Motives, and feelings which gave rise to the Revolution have been very superficially and imperfectly investigated. For one example among many, The dread of the Hierarchy; and of the high principles in Religion and government; which then prevailed in the Church of England and which were more openly and dogmatically professed and asserted in America than in England itself – Are not sufficiently known, and have not been sufficiently considered. – Indeed it is almost impossible to convince at this day, any young Man; or even any middle aged Man of the extravagance to which those high doctrines were carried before the Revolution…And of the Authority of the Church in matters of Religion – yet these Doctrines, I heard asserted almost every day – The idea that such a Church, and such doctrines and such Hierarchy where [sic] to be established by Act of Parliament appeared to me worse than Death – As I know this to be the feeling and Principle of all the Dissenters in America – I did not believe they would submit to it…I therefore believe as early as I can remember, that this Country would never submit to the Unlimited Authority of Parliament – And this opinion forced me to consider what would be the consequences of an attempt on the part of Great Britain, to carry into execution a Soverign Legislative Authority over Us. – War and Carnage, and devastation I saw – or thought I saw must be the consequence – and I fully believed that all the horrours of such a Contest would never wholly subdue the old non-conformist Spirit…” Signed boldly and clearly “John Adams”. Two page letter with integral franked address leaf measures 8″ x 10″. Minor loss from seal tear on address leaf, else near fine. Housed in a light blue cloth folding case, with the blue morocco spine lettered gilt. Sold for $45,000.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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George Washington Autograph Document Signed — Washington Itemizes a 1774 Invoice for His Former Aide-de-Camp in Securing Bounty Land Under the 1754 Proclamation — With University Archives COA

Exceptional autograph document signed by George Washington from 1774 regarding bounty land promised to Virginia veterans of the French & Indian War, per the Proclamation of 1754. When distribution of the land stalled after the war, Washington famously took it upon himself to lobby on behalf of the veterans, even hiring a surveyor to divvy up the 20,000 acres himself. He was criticized, however, for reportedly setting aside the best land for himself and his friends, with this invoice revealing his efforts on behalf of his former aide-de-camp, George Mercer, and Mercer’s brother.

Dated 25 January 1774, Washington handwrites at top, ”Col. George Mercer on acct. of the Land under the Proclamation of 1754…” He details meetings beginning in 1770 in Fredericksburg, when Washington was appointed agent for securing the land, writing ”voted at Fredericksburg at this meeting, it being for your own & Brother’s shares…” Washington again writes about advocating for Mercer and his brother at a meeting in March 1771 in Winchester, and then bills for ”Surveying 13532 acres Patented in y’r own name” in November 1772. He also charges for ”y’r prop’n of the cost of Surveying a tract of 6788 ac’s – in w’ch you hold 2816 ac’s.”

Additional charges are listed, along with credits, for a total charge of over 40 pounds. Boldly signed ”Go: Washington” at conclusion. Interestingly, it’s unlikely that Washington ever collected on the bill, as Mercer, a strong loyalist, moved to England before the Revolutionary War. Document is in extraordinarily well-preserved condition, with bold handwriting throughout. Measures 7.625” x 7”. Mounting remnants to verso, otherwise near fine condition. With University Archives COA. Sold for $37,500.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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University Archives COA. Click image to enlarge.

Incredible Secretary of State James Madison Autograph on a July 1803 Letter Regarding the April 1803 Offer from France for the Louisiana Purchase

James Madison autograph on a letter, as Secretary of State, dated 18 July 1803 and directed to Rhode Island Senator Christopher Ellery, requesting his presence at a special session of Congress to vote on the Louisiana Purchase. Exceptional letter reads in full, “(Circular.) Department of State, Washington, July 18, 1803. / Sir, The Proclamation by the President, of which a copy is inclosed, will inform you, that in pursuance of his authority to convene Congress on extraordinary occasions, he has appointed Monday the 17th day of October next for the meeting of the Senators and Representatives of the United States. This anticipation of the commencement of the ensuing session is rendered necessary by conventions with the French Republic, involving a cession of Louisiana to the United States; which may require the presence of both Houses, and of which conventions the ratifications are to be exchanged within six months computed from the 30th of April last. The shortness of the period therefore, to which the necessary proceedings will be limited, with the very great importance of the subject to the interest of the United States, claim from every member the most punctual attendance; and I am charged by the President to urge these considerations on your patriotism, and your sense of duty. Assurance myself that they will have all the effect which he justly expects from them. I remain, Sir, With the highest respect, Your most obedient Servant,” signed “James Madison”. In April 1803, James Madison received the unexpected offer from France to purchase the vast swath of territory from New Orleans to Minnesota and westward to part of present day Idaho. Working under a deadline from France of ratifying the purchase by October 30, Madison quickly agreed to purchase terms with France, forwarded the document to President Thomas Jefferson in late July, and then summoned Congress to a special session. Ellery and his fellow Senators voted on 20 October, just ten days before France’s deadline, and ratified the Louisiana Purchase Treaty by a vote of 24-7 (the controversial purchase was opposed by some as unconstitutional). Upon its completion, Napoleon Bonaparte remarked, “This accession of territory affirms forever the power of the United States, and I have given England a maritime rival who sooner or later will humble her pride.” Letter measures approximately 9.5″ x 12″. Single page with integral address panel is additionally free-franked signed by Madison. Seal hole and small chip at center fold, else near fine. While this letter theoretically exists for the approximate 200 U.S. Senators, Representatives and Governors in 1803, this is only the third such letter or occurrence of this letter to come to auction, making it exceptionally scarce. A significant document from the largest and most important territorial acquisition of the United States in her history.  Dark James Madison autograph.  Sold for $37,000.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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George Washington Letter Signed & Free Frank Signed, with Exceptionally Bold Signatures on Both — With University Archives COAs for Both Signatures — Plus James Monroe Signed Land Grant

Lot of two signatures by George Washington: a letter signed, and additional free frank signed, both with the boldest signatures we’ve ever encountered by the first President. In his letter dated 21 October 1799 from Mount Vernon, Washington responds to Captain Abraham Shepherd regarding an appointment to the Provisional Army, noting that ”…it will be pleasing to find, in the list of Candidates, the names of such as were valuable Officers in our Revolutionary War…your letter will not be forgotten…[signed] Go: Washington”.

Letter on bifolium stationery has integral address leaf additionally signed by Washington with his free frank. Addressed to Captain Shepherd with postmark of 21 October, Washington handwrites ”Free / Go: Washington” with a very dark, bold pen. Each page measures 7.875” x 10”. Folds, with some paper loss, especially to address leaf, and affixed to paper as inlay. Overall in good plus condition. With University Archives COAs for both signatures.

Lot also includes land grant signed by James Monroe, dated 6 October 1817. Visible portion measures 12” x 9”, framed to 19” x 16.5”. Not examined out of frame, appears very good but with faded signature. Sold for $31,250.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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University Archives COA. Click image to enlarge.
University Archives COA. Click image to enlarge.

John Adams ALS as President, Who Didn’t Have a Full-Time Military! — “…an Army and Navy Establishment is essential to the present & future Interests & Greatness of the United States…”

Historically important John Adams autograph letter signed dated 19 July 1799, during his term as the second American President. Adams writes from Quincy, Massachusetts to Secretary of War James McHenry regarding the need for a standing army and navy, warning of embarrassment should the department heads be surprised. After the end of the American Revolution, the U.S., distrustful of standing militaries, sold off the last ship in its Continental navy and disbanded its army. A small navy was reinstated to protect American commerce with the onset of war in Europe in 1793. The U.S. negotiated a treaty with Britain but negotiations with France broke down during the XYZ affair. France, an ally to the American colonies during the American Revolution, now saw the U.S. as a British ally during their own war with England, and began seizing American merchant ships. In 1798, Congress established a Department of the Navy and empowered the merchant marine to defend American ships. A provisional army was also authorized. Peace negotiations with France began in January 1799, while Adams continued to build up the American military, as reflected in this letter. It reads in part, “…I agree with you…that both an Army and Navy Establishment is essential to the present and future Interests & Greatness of the United States and that We must run the Risks which other Nations have run. It appeared to me that Offices were created and Salaries made necessary in the Plan for Supplying the Army, which would require the Interposition of Congress, But if the Powers already given to Administration are Sufficient I am Satisfied…J. Adams”. This letter appears in “The Works of John Adams,” volume 8, 1856. Minor foxing and dampstaining along left edge of single page letter, measuring 8″ x 9.75″. Separation to folds; overall very good. Sold for $27,000.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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George Washington & Thomas Jefferson Large 1793 Document Signed by Washington as President and Jefferson as Secretary of State

Scarce single-page document dated 8 October 1793 signed by President George Washington, “Go: Washington” and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson “Th: Jefferson” printed in three columns in French, English and Dutch. Issued to “Gabriel Haven, master and commander of the Brigantine called The Betsey of New York lying at present in the port of New York bound for the West Indies and laden with Onions and Flour.” The middle panel contains Washington and Jefferson’s signatures in ink along with New York Mayor Richard Varick and of John Lamb, Collector of Customs for the Port of New York. The United States of America and Mayoralty of New York paper seals are intact on the document, which measures 12.5″ x 16″ and is displayed in a 15.5″ x 21.5″ frame. Slight toning, folds and some chipping; overall very good. Sold for $26,502.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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John Adams Autograph Document Signed as Vice President, and President of the Senate, Confirming a List of Electors for the 1792 Presidential Election

Scarce autograph document signed by John Adams, who here signs in 1792 as “President of the Senate of the United States”. Then serving as Vice President under George Washington, Adams confirms receipt of the Rhode Island Electors for the 1792 Presidential election, which re-elected Washington and himself.

Document, composed entirely in Adams’ hand, reads in full, “Philadelphia Dec’r 25, 1792 / Rec’d from the hand of Daniel Updike Esquire a Packet certified by the Electors of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, to contain a List of their Votes for President and Vice President of the United States / John Adams President of the Senate of the United States.” Single page bifolium document measures 8″ x 9.625″. Separation starting along folds, small chips to left edge, a few pieces of tape repair and toning. Fully intact with bold handwriting, overall in very good condition. Originally from the collection of John Lorimer Graham. Sold for $25,041.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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John Adams Twice-Signed Check — Slabbed by PSA/DNA

John Adams twice-signed check, signed ”John Adams” at lower right and also ”John Adams Welsh” to his namesake, the son of his close friends Thomas and Abigail Welsh. Partially printed check is drawn from the ”Massachusetts Bank” in 1815 for $100, filled out in Adams’ hand, and unusual in that most payments of the time were entirely handwritten, in the form of a promissory note, and not a bank-issued document such as this. Check measures 4.75” x 2”, irregularly trimmed along edges. Two file holes, not affecting signatures; overall in very good plus condition. Slabbed by PSA/DNA. A rare check signed by the second President. Sold for $24,361.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Benjamin Franklin Document Signed as President of the Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth — Franklin Appoints the Coroner of Luzerne County

Benjamin Franklin document signed as President of the Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth, appointing a Nathan Cary as the Coroner of Luzerne County. An exceptionally scarce type of document signed by Franklin, whose signature as then-Governor of Pennsylvania is highly desirable and scarce on its own. Dated 22 October 1787, Franklin’s large signature appears at left, underscored by an elaborate paraph. Red wax-based paper seal for Pennsylvania appears at top. Document measures 15.625” x 13”. Light foxing, two small spots of worming, and small holes at intersecting folds, with archival tape repair to verso. A bright document, in very good condition. Sold for $23,750.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Benjamin Franklin Letter Signed to Scotsman Lord Kames, Mentioning His Book on Successful Living, “…you will not doubt my being serious in the Intention of finishing my Art of Virtue…”

Very long and beautifully penned letter signed by Benjamin Franklin, written to Henry Home, Lord Kames, one of the principal figures of the Scottish Enlightenment, and mentor to both David Hume and Adam Smith. The American scientist and founding father writes to Kames from London on 21 October 1761 on a variety of topics, including effusive praise of Kames’ book, “Introduction to the Art of Thinking” and anticipation of Kames’ next book, “Elements of Criticism”. Franklin also mentions his own book “Art of Virtue”, which he never finished but seems inspired to complete after reading Kames’ work. Letter reads in part,

“My dear Lord, It is long since I have afforded myself the Pleasure of writing to you. As I grow in Years I find I grow more indolent, and more apt to procrastinate. I am indeed a bad Correspondent; but what avails Confession without Amendment!” Sold for $21,000.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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George Washington Autograph Document Signed as President, Also Signed by Thomas Jefferson as Secretary of State

George Washington and Thomas Jefferson document signed as President and Secretary of State. Datelined Philadelphia on 8 March 1792, document appoints “Zachariah Rhodes of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations…Inspector of the Revenue for the Port of Patuxet”. Vellum document measures 14.25″ x 12″ with intact red wax-based paper seal. Repaired separation and paper loss along folds, and light soiling. Signatures of “Go. Washington” and “Th. Jefferson” are large and remain strong. Sold for $20,406.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Benjamin Franklin 1785 Document Signed as President of Pennsylvania — Excellent, Bold Signature

Benjamin Franklin signs an interest certificate, dated 19 October 1785, one day after being elected President of Pennsylvania. Until May of that year he had served the new American nation as ambassador to France. Now, in a position similar to a modern day governor, Franklin authorizes Pennsylvania Treasurer David Rittenhouse to pay ”to Gilbert Quirk late private of Musquetry of the Pennsylvania Line, or his order, the sum of two pounds eight shillings being one year’s interest on his depreciation certificate, due the tenth day of April 1782 agreeably to an act of The General Assembly, intitled, ‘An act to appropriate certain monies arising from the excise, for the payment of the annual interest due on unalienated certificates therein mentioned,’ passed the twenty-first day of March 1783, and out of the fund appropriated by the said act, for the purposes therein mentioned.” He signs boldly, ”B. Franklin Presid.” with a paraph accentuating his name. The certificate, issued in Philadelphia, is endorsed on the verso: ”Received the within contents in full / For George Bickham / Sam Fulton”. Minor toning and foxing to 7.75” x 6.25” document, with tape repair to verso. Overall near fine condition. Sold for $15,436.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Benjamin Franklin Signed Land Grant for Revolutionary War Veteran — From 1787 One Month Before Franklin Attended the Constitutional Convention

Benjamin Franklin land grant signed in Philadelphia on 27 April 1787, just one month before the start of the Constitutional Convention held in that city. Franklin served as President of Philadelphia’s Executive Council and signs ”B. Franklin” in that capacity, granting Private William Williams land in exchange for his service in the Revolutionary War. Document measures 15” x 12.5”, beautifully matted and framed to 40” x 23”. Weighs 14 lbs. Folds, toning and light staining throughout. Very good condition. Sold for $15,125.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Alexander Hamilton 1792 Letter Signed

Alexander Hamilton letter signed as Secretary of Treasury, describing the content of another letter originally enclosed with this one. Reads, “Sir, I herewith send you a copy of a Circular letter which I have this day written to the Collectors of the Customs. The arrangement therein suggested will conduce very much to the order of the [beliefs] of the Treasury and is presumed to be conformable with law.” Proud of his new set-forth plan, Hamilton continues to write, “I feel a confidence that it will meet with the cheerful coop[or]ation of the federal Courts and their respective Officers, that the arrangement itself, will be found well-adapted to the security of all parties/ I am Sir, with consideration/ Your Obed. Servant/ A Hamilton.” Marked “(Circular)” at the top left corner, and dated “Treasury Department/ June 8 1792,” the full-page letter measures 7.5″ x 8.5″. Folds, slight toning, and a water stain affecting only one word. Professionally matted with a portrait of the first Secretary of Treasury; overall the ink in bold and his signature are very clean, making this a valuable and fine piece. Sold for $9,562.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Alexander Hamilton Letters Signed Discussing Collection Law — “…I feel a confidence that it will meet with the chearful co-operation of the several courts…”

Lot contains one printed circular discussing revenue and collection law, signed by Hamilton, and a handwritten letter, also signed by Hamilton, from the same correspondence. Handwritten letter reads in full, ”Sir I herewith send you a copy of a circular letter which I have this day written to the collectors of the customs. The arrangement therein suggested will conduce very much to the order of the business of the Treasury, and is presented to be conformable with law. I feel a confidence that it will meet with the chearful co-operation of the several courts and their respective Officers, and that the arrangement, itself, will be found well adapted to the security of all parties.” Signed ”A. Hamilton”. Circular reads in part, ”…Sir, the 66, 67 and 68th sections of the Collection Law make provision respecting the prosecution, receipt, appropriation and distribution of and for fines, penalties and forfeitures, under that act. The provision is less specific and clear than could be withheld, and may require legislative revision. In the mean time it is indispensable that some arrangement should be made and observed…” Signed ”A. Hamilton” at its conclusion. Dark Alexander Hamilton autograph examples.  Letters measure 7.5” x 9” and 7.25” x 9.25” respectively. Folds to handwritten letter with very light creasing and archival tape to verso. Folds, toning and light spotting to circular. Very good plus condition. Accompanied by an auction COA from PSA/DNA.  Sold for $9,493.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Auction your US Constitution 40 Signers complete set at Nate D. Sanders Auctions. Email a description & images of your US Constitution 40 Signers complete set to nate@natedsanders.com.

John Adams 1800 Land Grant Signed as President With Bold Signature — Awarding Revolutionary War General William Woodford 2,500 Acres in Ohio

John Adams land grant signed as President, dated 22 May 1800, awarding Brigadier General William Woodford 2,500 acres in Ohio between the ”Little Miami and Sciota Rivers”. Land was awarded to General Woodford for his military service in the Revolutionary War; General Woodford served with George Washington in the French and Indian War and was promoted to General in 1777 before being wounded at the Battle of Brandywine. In 1779 he was captured in the Battle of Charleston and, in 1780, died aboard a British prison ship. Woodford Counties in Kentucky and Illinois are named in his honor. Document is countersigned by Charles Lee as ”executing the office” of Secretary of State, and also by Secretary of War James McHenry upon the verso. Original blindstamped seal is intact. Grant measures 13” x 15”. Expected light wear to vellum, and a small triangular portion of paper loss to lower left. Overall in very good plus condition with an exceptionally bold signature by Adams. Sold for $8,319.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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Alexander Hamilton Signature as Treasury Secretary — With JSA COA

Alexander Hamilton signature as Treasury Secretary, dated 10 March 1792. Signed with his full name, “Alexander Hamilton”. Cut signature from partially printed document, with visible portion measuring 3″ x 3.75″, framed to 17.5″ x 16″. Not examined out of frame; fold underneath signature, overall near fine. With JSA COA. Sold for $6,520.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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JSA COA. Click image to enlarge.

John Hancock & Samuel Adams Signed Judicial Appointment From 1793

John Hancock and Samuel Adams dual-signed judicial appointment, signed as Massachusetts Governor and Lieutenant Governor, respectively. Document appoints William Heath Esq. as Judge of the Court of Probate for Norfolk County, Massachusetts on 9 July 1793. Hancock boldly signs ”John Hancock” underneath seal, with his familiar paraph below signature. Adams signs ”S Adams” to verso of document. Measures 8” x 12.5” on one sheet. Folds, light toning and spotting. Ink remains very bold and legible. In very good to near fine condition given age. Sold for $6,250.

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Alexander Hamilton Letter Signed Framed

Secretary of Treasury Alexander Hamilton letter signed, dated 1790. Part of a large matted and framed presentation that includes the sepia ink letter in Hamilton’s hand, accompanied by a plaque and a copy of a black and white engraved portrait of Hamilton. Addressed to “Will Channing Esquire / Attorney for the United States Newport,” letter reads in full, “Treasury Department / October 7th 1790 / Sir – I am to acknowledge my obligation to you for your attention to the request Hooks the liberty to make in my letter of the 31st of August. Your letter on that subject has been received. And Mr. Bowen is informed that the sureties offered are satisfactory. I am sir very respectfully your obedient servant / A Hamilton.” Single-page letter, measuring 8″ x 8″, has a few wrinkles and cracks not affecting legibility, overall in near fine condition. Brass plaque reads in full: “Alexander Hamilton 1757-1804. Secretary of the Treasury 1789-1795. On July 11th Hamilton dueled with his rival Aaron Burr, was unsuccessful and died the next day.” Illustration measures 5.5″ x 8″. Plaque measures 5″ x 2″. Entire wood framed presentation measures 26″ x 29″. An excellent lot in overall mint condition. Sold for $5,000.

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Samuel Adams Signed Military Appointment From 1794

Samuel Adams military document signed as Governor of Massachusetts, dated 11 September 1794. Adams appoints Abiah Bliss Jr. as Lieutenant in the Militia of the Massachusetts Commonwealth. Elegantly signed ”Samuel Adams” below the seal on the left side, countersigned by John Avery, Jr. as Massachusetts Secretary. Measures 15.75” x 12.25”. Separation starting along folds and small chips to margin. Overall very good condition. Sold for $3,000.

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Samuel Adams Signed Military Appointment as Governor of Massachusetts

Samuel Adams military document signed as Governor of Massachusetts, dated 2 May 1797. Adams appoints Joel Fox as Ensign in the Militia of the Massachusetts Commonwealth. Signed ”Samuel Adams” below the blind-stamped seal on left side, countersigned by John Avery, Jr. as Massachusetts Secretary. Measures 15” x 9.25”, beautifully framed in black and gold to 21” x 15.5”. Split along folds, including through Adams name, though archivally repaired on verso. Very good plus condition. Sold for $2,625.

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Founding Father Abraham Baldwin Autograph Letter Signed as U.S. Senator Regarding Impeachment Trial of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase

Abraham Baldwin autograph letter signed with rare content on the impeachment trial of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase. Datelined Washington, 8 January 1805 (Baldwin mid-dates the year as 1804), Baldwin writes to his brother Henry while serving as U.S. Senator from Georgia. In part, “…The day appointed for the trial of the impeachment is the fourth of Feby that is also the day of putting in his answer which he swears he was not prepared to do on the former day. It is possible his answer may require the managers to ask further time though I believe it is not expected…Abr Baldwin”. On 1 March 1805 the U.S. Senate voted to acquit Chase of impeachment (after the House voted for impeachment), thereby deeply establishing the independence of Supreme Court Justices. Single page letter measures 7.75″ x 13″. Closed tear at right edge, partially affecting signature. Overall very good condition. Sold for $2,310.

US Constitution 40 Signers complete set
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