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Sell Your Apollo 11 Flown Command Module Columbia Memorabilia for $150,000

FREE APPRAISAL for your Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia memorabilia.  EMAIL Nate@NateDSanders.com for your valuation up to $150,000 or more plus your opportunity to auction your Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia memorabilia for a 0% seller’s commission.  You may also call our Nate D. Sanders Auction House (http://www.NateDSanders.com) at (310) 440-2982.

Apollo 11 Flown Command Module Columbia Memorabilia

The Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia is on display at The Smithsonian so it is uncommon to find Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia memorabilia.  But, two Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia memorabilia items have sold.  Here they are:

In 2017, a piece from the Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia sold for almost $150,000

In 2000, a different piece from the Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia sold for $34,500

At Nate D. Sanders Auction House (http://www.NateDSanders.com), we can obtain up to $150,000 or more for your Apollo 11 flown Command Module Columbia memorabilia and offer you 0% seller’s commission, the best auction rate in the auction business.  We have a huge history of selling Mercury, Gemini & Apollo space flown memorabilia and here is a recent USA Today article illustrating that:

Astronaut John Glenn’s orbit the Earth in-flight instructions fetch $67,000

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/07/22/astronaut-john-glenns-orbit-earth–flight-instructions-fetch-67000/87437254/

Astronaut John Glenn’s in-flight instructions from his historic 1962 mission around Earth fetched nearly $67,000 at auction in Los Angeles on Thursday.

Glenn used the instructions aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft on his Mercury- Atlas 6 mission when he became the first American astronaut to orbit Earth. The instructions include a flight plan that detailed celestial bodies and geographical landmarks so he could track his position during the nearly five-hour mission. The astronaut executed tasks on a check-list that directed when he should take photos, put on his helmet and exercise.

Robert Pearlman, editor of collectspace.com, a website dedicated to space history and artifacts, wasn’t surprised to see the memento garner such a high price because so few objects flew on the Friendship 7 spacecraft. The craft was so small, Glenn couldn’t bring much with him, he said.

Glenn originally gave the instructions as a thank-you gift to a member of the underwater demolition team, Richard Dunham, who helped retrieve the astronaut after the spacecraft splash-landed into the ocean. Dunham gave the flight documents to U.S. Navy veteran Justin C. Pollard.

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