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Orson Welles Memorabilia from Citizen Kane Sells for $1.75 Million Dollars All Together

To buy, consign or sell Orson Welles memorabilia from Citizen Kane and Orson Welles memorabilia in general, please email Nate@NateDSanders.com or phone (310) 440.2982.

Orson Welles Memorabilia

Here at NateDSanders.com, our business got a big jump in 2011 when we started to sell Orson Welles memorabilia from Citizen Kane, and boy oh boy, did it sell.  Orson Welles Oscar sold for over $800,000.  The trophy from Citizen Kane sold for almost $300,000.  Anyway, please see all of our highlights of Orson Welles memorabilia from Citizen Kane sold below:

Original Oscar Awarded to Orson Welles for Writing “Citizen Kane” — The Only Academy Award Won by “Citizen Kane,” Voted the Greatest American Film of All Time

The finest and most desirable item in Hollywood collecting — the original Oscar awarded to Orson Welles for best “Original Screenplay” for “Citizen Kane.” This Oscar statue, awarded by The American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, is the very same statue presented to Orson Welles on 26 February 1942 at the Biltmore Hotel. Now widely accepted as the greatest motion picture in the history of cinema the world over, “Citizen Kane” was nominated in nine categories at the 14th Academy Awards, though this was the masterpiece’s singular win. It is also the only Oscar for a Welles film, won by the first-time director who was able to execute his vision for the film with unheard-of final cut privilege granted by RKO Pictures. Welles’ revolutionary camera, sound, and editing techniques are often cited as evidence of Citizen Kane’s ground-breaking contribution to the universal language of cinema. The multiple controversies the movie ignited at the time of its release were eclipsed only by its ultimate grand scale success. Welles stars in the film, portraying a character whose personal happiness and moral fibre deteriorate as his wealth and power skyrocket – a character based recognizably on publishing mogul William Randolph Hearst. Feeling exposed by its depiction of his affair with Marion Davies, Hearst leveraged his clout and fortune to wage war on the picture. This, coupled with Welles’ shockingly unconventional filmmaking style, alienated enough of the general public to thwart box office success. Hearst’s threats to the industry also spoiled the film’s reception in Hollywood, with the exception of some critics whose reviews acknowledged Citizen Kane’s weighty merit. The movie’s legacy of on and offscreen drama has beset even the award itself; for years it had gone missing and the Academy issued a replacement to Beatrice Welles, Orson’s youngest daughter and sole heir. The original had all along been in the possession of cinematographer Gary Graver, who tried to sell it in 1994. Beatrice learned of her father’s treasure resurfacing and filed suit in California, stopping the sale, and returning this precious piece to the Welles family, who displayed it at the 75th Academy Awards in 2003. Complete chain of ownership will be provided to the winning bidder. The provenance is currently from a private collection. Two engraved plaques are placed on opposite sides of the Belgian marble pedestal. One reads, “Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences / First Award / 1941”. The other reads, “Academy First Award To Orson Welles / For Writing / Original Screenplay of ‘Citizen Kane'”. The figure and film reel, composed of gold-plated britannium measuring 10.5″ tall, top the pedestal, bringing the total height to 12″. The pedestal’s diameter measures 5.25″. The award weighs 7 pounds, 5 ounces. Some tarnishing to statue, primarily to the leg area of the figure. The green felt backing under the pedestal is worn away around the edge. Overall in very good condition. A spectacular tribute to the visionary director and screenwriter, Orson Welles, and to the film he brought to life.  The best item of Orson Welles memorabilia from Citizen Kane.  Sold for $861,542.

Orson Welles Memorabilia Original Oscar Awarded to Herman Mankiewicz for Writing "Citizen Kane" -- The Only Academy Award Won by "Citizen Kane," Voted the Greatest American Film of All-Time

Original Oscar Awarded to Herman Mankiewicz for Writing “Citizen Kane” — The Only Academy Award Won by “Citizen Kane,” Voted the Greatest American Film of All-Time — The Priciest Item of Orson Welles Memorabilia

Original Oscar Awarded to Herman Mankiewicz for Writing “Citizen Kane” — The Only Academy Award Won by “Citizen Kane,” Voted the Greatest American Film of All-Time

An incredible piece of Hollywood history and memorabilia. The only Oscar won by “Citizen Kane,” voted the greatest American film of all-time by the American Film Institute. Mankiewicz received the award for best original screenplay with the visionary director, writer and actor, Orson Welles, on 26 February 1942 at the Biltmore Hotel. The duel credit to Welles and Mankiewicz would be hotly disputed by both parties, critics and their peers. Influential film critic Pauline Kael attributed Kane’s screenplay to Mankiewicz, particularly offensive to the “one man band” credit Welles was receiving for the film. Rumors materialized publicly that Welles had tried to pay Mankiewicz off, in exchange for Welles to take all the credit for himself. Mankiewicz stated in a letter to his father, “The fact is that there isn’t one single line in the picture that wasn’t in writing – writing from and by me – before ever a camera turned.” The Screen Writers Guild ended the initial debate by decreeing a joint credit on the film but historians still debate whose hand penned which lines of the seminal 1941 masterpiece. Two engraved plaques are placed on opposite sides of the Belgian marble pedestal. One reads, “Academy of / Motion Picture / Arts and Sciences / First Award / 1941”. The other reads, “Academy First Award / To / Herman J. Mankiewicz / For Writing / Original Screenplay of / ‘Citizen Kane'”. The figure and film reel, composed of gold-plated britannium measuring 10.5″ tall, top the pedestal, bringing the total height to 12″. The pedestal’s diameter measures 5.25″. The award weighs 7 pounds, 5 ounces. Some tarnishing to statue, primarily to the leg area of the figure. The green felt backing under the pedestal is slightly wearing away around the edge. Overall in very good condition.  The second highest price ever paid for Citizen Kane & Orson Welles memorabilia.  Sold for $588,455.

Orson Welles Memorabilia Original Oscar Awarded to Herman Mankiewicz for Writing "Citizen Kane" -- The Only Academy Award Won by "Citizen Kane," Voted the Greatest American Film of All-Time

Original Oscar Awarded to Herman Mankiewicz for Writing “Citizen Kane” — The Only Academy Award Won by “Citizen Kane,” Voted the Greatest American Film of All-Time

Orson Welles Memorabilia Being a Screen-Used Trophy From ”Citizen Kane” — the Iconic Trophy That Orson Welles Holds During the Film, Symbolizing the Height of Kane’s Power & Ambition — Measures 1.5 Feet Tall

The rarest and most spectacular of all “Citizen Kane” props, the silver-plated trophy presented to Orson Welles as Charles Foster Kane, which he holds in the critical scene upon his return from Europe, flush from acquiring diamonds and his first wife. This trophy is the singular one manufactured for the film (unlike the Rosebud sled, of which three were made), thus guaranteeing its use in the film, held by Welles himself as Kane. The trophy was given to Kane by the employees of his newspaper, which grew from a handful when Kane acquired the near-bankrupt “Inquirer,” to 467 at this point in the film. Trophy is engraved, “Welcome Home / Mr. Kane / From / 467 Employees / of the / New York / Inquirer”. Of course, this trophy also highlights the lack of real journalistic achievement by Kane’s tabloid newspaper, and rather the heaps of praise bestowed upon him by employees and sycophants. The scene in which it first appeared was considered so crucial to the film and so difficult to execute that Gregg Toland, “Citizen Kane’s” Oscar-winning cinematographer, considered it the proudest achievement of his career. The trophy appears once more in the film, at the end with Kane’s other possessions at Xanadu. In this scene, Jerry Thompson, the reporter, and Raymond, Kane’s butler, talk about the meaning of Rosebud while standing over the trophy; they even read the wording on the trophy during this scene. Silver-plated loving cup trophy measures a very impressive 17.5″ tall and 16.75″ wide, with scrolling leaf-clad handles and scrolling base, manufactured by the Barbour Silver Company. Though “Citizen Kane” is widely considered the greatest film of all time (having won “Best Film of the Decade” for two decades by both the AFI and BFI), it only won one Academy Award for screenwriting — a consequence of William Randolph Hearst’s blacklisting in his theatres. Its popularity and significance has steadily risen since its release in 1941, a time when movie studios retained very few of their movie props. As a result, only a handful of “Citizen Kane” props have come to market, with almost all of them from the final warehouse scene at Xanadu and having no significance to the film’s plot. This trophy, along with the Rosebud sleds and the snow globe (which has never been available and is considered lost or broken) are the handful of important props in the film. It is truly the most magnificent “Citizen Kane” screen-used prop one could ever hope to own, from the Golden Age of Hollywood that included such films as “Casablanca” and “Gone With the Wind.” Previous Christie’s auction provenance is also included. Some silver tarnishing to the trophy, and light wear, but overall in near fine condition.

The only two Academy Awards won by “Citizen Kane” (for Best Original Screenplay co-awarded to Orson Welles and Herman Mankiewicz) sold at Nate D. Sanders Auctions for $861,542 and $588,455. Several other “Citizen Kane” lots are included in this auction including memorabilia related to the trophy cup.  A fantastic item of Orson Welles memorabilia from Citizen Kane. Sold for $275,544.

Orson Welles Memorabilia Orson Welles Screen-Used Trophy From ''Citizen Kane'' -- the Iconic Trophy That Orson Welles Holds During the Film, Symbolizing the Height of Kane's Power & Ambition -- Measures 1.5 Feet Tall

Orson Welles Screen-Used Trophy From ”Citizen Kane” — the Iconic Trophy That Orson Welles Holds During the Film, Symbolizing the Height of Kane’s Power & Ambition — Measures 1.5 Feet Tall — Tremendous Orson Welles Memorabilia

 

Orson Welles Signs His Personally Owned & Used Typewriter — Used Circa 1930’s-40’s During the Writing of ”Citizen Kane”

American cultural icon Orson Welles’ personal typewriter signed. Fully functional Underwood Standard Portable Typewriter is signed in black marker ”Orson” on the left side of the front board, and ”Welles” on the right side. This is an early Underwood four-bank model dating to the year of its debut in 1926, and was likely used by Welles during the 1930’s and 40’s, at which time he wrote ”Citizen Kane” for which he won 1941’s ”Best Original Screenplay” Oscar. Also during this time Welles wrote a controversial Hollywood column in the ”New York Post” and a plethora of adaptations of literary works, including ”Around the World in 80 Days” for radio broadcast and the infamous hoax he perpetrated by means of his adaptation of H.G. Wells’ ”The War of the Worlds.” He also wrote the screenplays for ”The Magnificent Ambersons,” ”The Lady From Shanghai” and ”Journey Into Fear” during this time. Early model points of the typewriter include: 1) the shift lock is a nickel-plated lever, not a glass key; 2) the ribbon reversal is controlled by a lever at the top right of the front plate, not a knob on the bottom; 3) the paper table bears a label that reads, ”Standard Four Bank Keyboard” in gilt lettering beneath the large ”Underwood” brand name; and 4) the patents listed on the back end at 8 December 1925. Measures 11.5” wide at the carriage, 10.5” deep, and 4.25” at its highest point. Some loss of finish, else near fine. Included is the original case labeled: ”Orson Welles / Hotel de la / Tremoille / Paris 8 France”, the Parisian hotel where he was known as a frequent guest. The case measures 12.25” wide by 12” deep by 5.5” high. Cracking to edges and loss of material to corners; very good. The signed Underwood typewriter and its case were originally acquired from Orson Welles’ February 1992 estate sale. An incredible item from an architect of modern theatrical art.  An excellent item of Orson Welles memorabilia from Citizen Kane.   Sold for $33,378.

Orson Welles Memorabilia Orson Welles Signs His Personally Owned & Used Typewriter -- Used Circa 1930's-40's During the Writing of ''Citizen Kane''

Orson Welles Signs His Personally Owned & Used Typewriter — Used Circa 1930’s-40’s During the Writing of ”Citizen Kane” — Great History on This Key Item of Orson Welles Memorabilia

To buy, consign or sell Orson Welles memorabilia from Citizen Kane and Orson Welles memorabilia in general, please email Nate@NateDSanders.com or phone (310) 440.2982.

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