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Virginia Civil War Letters Lot Sell for $13,500 at NateDSanders.com Auctions

To auction, buy, consign or sell Virginia Civil War letters, please email Nate at Nate@NateDSanders.com or phone (310) 440-2982.

Virginia Civil War Letters

Virginia Civil War letters are very collectible.  Prices are very strong right now.  Here is a fantastic Virginia Civil War letters lot that we at NateDSanders.com Auctions sold:

39 War-Dated Virginia Civil War Letters by 1st Virginia Cavalryman — Battles of Cold Harbor, Gaines’ Mill, Antietam, Manassas, Seven Pines, Dranesville & Hunter’s Raid — “…Our loss was 160 killed, wounded and missing…They outnumbered us 5 to one. We got all our dead and wounded the next morning…” & “…we came up with the enemy at Cole Harbour abought 3 o’clock Thursday 26th, when the fight commenced and has lasted 5 dayes with very little cesation…” & “…I went in the great fight at Sharpsburg with the 2nd South Carolina Regt. I experanced some pretty hard fighting in that battle…”

Excellent 39 Virginia Civil War letters lot by Thomas W. Colley of the 1st Virginia Cavalry, Co. D. Wounded four times during the war, including losing a finger and being shot, it wasn’t until the Battle of Hawes’ Shop in May 1864 that Colley was discharged for wounds, after having his foot amputated. Until then, he was engaged in dozens of battles, many of which he writes about here, including Cold Harbor, Gaines’ Mill, Antietam, Manassas, Seven Pines and Dranesville. In a letter to his brother on 7 December 1861, Colley writes, “…We are still expecting the enemy to advance. There was a small party of them come up to the Court House picket on the 27th inst and exchanged a few shots with our boyes. Biley Morell and Gilbert Grenway wer on post whare the enemy came to. They fired on

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them. As soon as the fireing was heard at the reserve they was joined by some 10 more of our boyes. They exchanged some 40 shots withe the enemy. There was abought 60 of the enemy. They could not stand our fire. They took to their heals and left us. We did not hit any of them. We wounded one of their horses. They did not hit anything on our side…” On 1 January 1862, Colley writes about the Battle of Dranesville, “…the fighting…at Drainesvill. It was tolable hard on our side. Our loss was 160 killed, wounded and missing. We do not know what the enemies loss was. The citizens of Drainesville say there loss 300. The Yankie papers give their loss at 10 killed and 15 wounded. They outnumbered us 50 to one. We got all our dead and wounded the next morning. There was some few of the enemy on the field next morning when we went back for our dead. We caried all our wounded of the evening of the battle except 15 whitch the enemy captured. We got them next morning. Our Regt. was not in the fight. The first Kentucky Regt. sufered the most and the artilery. We had 20 artilery horses killed.

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We did not loose any of our artilery. One piece had to be hawled off by hand all the horses being killed. The enemy did not molest a thing that was left on the field by our men. We had too casons blown up full of bom-shells whitch killed several men and horses. General Stewart did not make anything by that fight onley saved his wagons whitch he had 215…We left the battle field on the 21 July. There is some few graves in our encampment…Tell Bill Cassel that I am very sorry that he tells my girl get maried. I do not know what I shal do for a wife now…” On 5 June 1862, Colley writes to his mother and sister about the Battle of Seven Pines: “…we drove the enemy from their entrenchments and captured all the artilery they had on this side of the River amounting in all to 16 pieces…The Artelery has commenced pretty rapidley this morning. It grows more rapid every hour. It may bring on another fight today. We are stationed abought 2 miles east of Richmond near the York River Railroad and abought 2 miles in the rear of our advanced forces…” A month later, on 5 July 1862, he writes to his sister about

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Cold Harbor and Gaines’ Mill: “…we camp up with the enemy at Cole Harbour abought 3 o’clock Thursday 26th, when the fight commenced and has lasted 5 dayes with very little cesation throughought the whole five dayes. We have bein in the saddle ever since until yesterday we got a little rest. The enemy are under cover of their gunboats on the James River. They are getting on their gunboats and transports as fast as they can. There is a great many of them on shore yet. Jackson, Longstreat and Ewels Divisions came down yesterday to atack them but have not done so yet. They wer drawn up in line of battle all day yesterday and last night and are still in the same position yet…The enemy would have bein completely routed if it had not bein for their gunboats. We had them entirely cut off from their gunboats on the Pamunkey River and they had to make their way to James River, a distance of 25 or 30 miles throug swamps and thickets. We captured very near every peace of artilery they had…It is reported we captured 25,000 prisoners with 80 pieces of artilery, 60,000 stands of small armes and a large amount of wagons and ambulances…Pendleton was wounded in the foot slightley. There was onley one man killed in the Regt…” Several weeks later Colley

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writes of Stonewall Jackson’s whereabouts and the loss of his friend, Samuel Hucher. He then writes of 2nd Bull Run on 31 August 1862, “…The Regt. was at Sudley Mills yesterday and Jackson was at Manasas. They had a pretty severe fight near Manasas on the 29th inst in whitch Generals Ewel Talifaro was dangerousley wounded. we suckceded in driving the enemy back with heavy loss. Our loss was between 700 and 800 men killed and wounded…” On 12 October 1862, Colley describes fighting at Antietam, “…we had some pretty hard times through the Mariland Campeign…I went in the great fight at Sharpsburg with the 2nd South Carolina Regt. I experanced some pretty hard fighting in that battle. I have a notion to swap places with John Alison in the 37th Va. Regt., Capt. Grahams company. I am geting tired of cavalry. It wears out too many horses…Very near all the prisoners that was taken in the Sharpsburg fight have bein

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paroled…” Colley loses his foot in the summer of 1864, which he describes to his sister, “…I will say it is a prety severe wound but not a dangerous one. I was shot in the ankle joint. I thought I would have it amputated before I would risk suffering what I am…” On 26 June 1864 from the hospital, he writes about Union General David Hunter’s famous raids, “…The railroad is tore up for some distance beyond Lynchburg. Hunter tore up things generaly whare ever he went. He makes a great bust of the way he ruined private property. He said he would have turned the lunaticks ought of the asylum at Staunton if he had not bein over persuaded by Crook and Averil. He said if he ever got the chance again he would surely turn them ought. He is the grandest villian I every have heard of since the war comenced…” Finally, Colley writes of a skirmish near Munson’s Hills, “…Our infantry are a throwing up brestworks…They had a skirmish with the Yankeys

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yesterday near Falls Church in whitch ther was 5 Yankees killed and some 15 taken prisoners. We lost one man…We drove the Yankeys from a hill that we have bein wanting to get possession of for some time. We can now have a vew of prety near all there opperations for two or three miles…Our Army extends from 10 miles above Manassa to this place makeing in all abought 25 miles…” Overall, an excellent Virginia Civil War letters lot from an exceptionally brave and hard-fighting soldier.  Sold for $13,500

Virginia Civil War Letters

39 War-Dated Letters by 1st Virginia Cavalryman — Battles of Cold Harbor, Gaines’ Mill, Antietam, Manassas, Seven Pines, Dranesville & Hunter’s Raid

To auction, buy, consign or sell Virginia Civil War letters, please email Nate at Nate@NateDSanders.com or phone (310) 440-2982.

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